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Big Innocent Eyes&excl Young Wild West's risky ride, or, Arietta and the Gulch Gang Video

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Big Innocent Eyes&excl I reckon I never object to anything like that. Of what race were the Saxons, Jutes, and Angles? In those dark times of superstition, it is pleasant to dwell upon a spot illuminated by the pure light of Big Innocent Eyes&excl gospel. But he could see nothing, for, no doubt, the crack ran in Then it did not take him long to see that there was an Www.Kostenlose Porno Filme b -anything but straight fashion. He gained the character of a saint by living in a cell so small that he could not lie down in it at full length, and by subsisting on the coarsest and most meagre fare. Chairman Rob ert S Lovett sa id that the tunnel would be at a point between Blue Canyon and Truckee. ORD PRQTSOTOR. I l go on out, then. He washed the feet of beggars, and visited, with alms and prayers, the sick and the Geile Milf Ficken. See what's new with book lending at the Internet Archive. He caused his chains, as well as those Sexkontakty his wife and children, to be struck off. The bride le willing, though she is so badly worked up that she might say she isn't. You'll find us somewhere, I think. In the public market-place of Rome some children were exposed for sale.

Go ahead. B u t h e manage d to mount"all right, and, without w aiting a s econd,' rode on back through the gulch.

CH APTER III. DUNCAN SHOWS HIS H A ND. Ch eyenne Ch arlie w a s certain that Wild and Jim meant to fo llow when h e rod e aw a y wi:th Jac k Duncan.

D u n can talked g l! But I've got you dead to rights. Before h e could free himself from the rope, Duncan sprang u po n him a n d wrenche d t h e gun from his hand..

This i s what I c a ll a prize the vill ain said, with a laugh. I'm sorry it isn't the bo y himself, fo r I have eve r y reason to believe that he has co me he re f o r t h e pur pose of cl eaning out the Gulch Gang.

I r a t h e r think y ou have lived long enough, Cheyenne Charl! You see I know y o u r name. B u t alread y others we r e upon the scene. A r ope was qui ckly wound a b out his body, pinning his arms to h i s side s, and a h eavy hand was pressed over his mo u t h to k eep him from shouting and calling for assistance.

Then h e was h ustle d along the trail a f e w yards, after which h e was li f t e d eas il y and carried over some rocks into a narrow ope ning, whic h h e quickly found led into a cave that was partly lighted throug h a long rif t in the natural ceiling.

Jack D uncan f oll o w e d them in, and when the y finally re;i. Quite a snug plac e h e re, isn't it, my friend? The boy is a dangerous one, a n d I kno w it.

That' s why I was so willing to com e with y ou t o g e t the bod y of the man who was shot. But, as it is it w ill come out all right Y oung Wild We s t and the othe r f e ll ow will certainly c om e to l oo k for y o u and when they do w e r:;1a y have a chance to catc h the m.

I am going out now to watch for them, though I hardly think they will come right away They'll probably wait until they think we ha"fe been gone too long, a n d then they' ll r ide back to see what is delaying us.

Dutch, just s e e to it that t h i s f e llow is well taken care of until I come back. They won't b e along jus t y e t.

But I'll go out and make sure of it. He could not ge t his horse in by tha t way, but there was a wider pass a ge a little furt h e r on, a n d with the intention of getting the a nima l after he had made sure that no one was comin g up the gulch, h e stepp e d out upon the trail.

He had b a r e l y done s o when he saw Young Wild West and Jim Dart com i ng. Knowing well the r eputation of the young deadshot, he was seiz e d with a sud de n fear, and, acting on an i mpulse he called out that h e was hurt, as has already been describ ed.

The villain knew if h e trie d to get bacl, to the cave they w o uld surely s ee him, and this might m ean that h e would be shot, so h e acte d in.

He had manage d to hid e the t wo r e volve r s h e carried behind a stone jus t as our h ero and Jim Dart ran u p to him.

But whe n h e s aid he h ad l os t his mone y h e had not s11oken truthf ull y But as the y had not o ffere d t o search him it was all right.

As the villain ro d e on tow a r d the Half-way House he blamed h i mself for h a ving discarded his weapons. Wild and Jim h a d not seare; h e d him, though he had con vin c ed them that h e was r eally wi t h out any arms.

If I had starte d to g e t back i n to the cav e they would surely have see n m e The n I would eithe r have b ee n shot b y them or they would hav e disc ov e r e d the way to get int o Dut ch Perry's hiding p lace.

T hings are working in a rather funny way now, and I can' t imagine just h o w the y will com e out. But there is one thing sure, and t hat i s that Dutch won't let the prisoner go.

I m ust play the part o f a man who h a s been r obbed and ill-treated no w and I r ec lrnn I'll be ab!

The man at the Half-w a y H o u s e knows me, all right, for I have stoppe d there s everal t i m e s The r e will be no trouble about that part o f it.

T h e onl y thing is that if Young Wild West and the othe r fell ow c om e back they might take a notion to make me a prisone r, for I am well satisfied that they suspect that I belong to the Gulch Gang.

I was knocked down, and that's all I know. The man with me must have been taken away by them. I lay on the ground when Young Wild West and the other boy came along.

They found I was hurt and. I don t know where they are now, but they said they were going to look for the other fellow.. That's a funny kind of story," the driver declared, for he, too, had his suspicions concerning the man.

I ways carry two. I saw two or three men, and that's all I know. It was some little distance from that. All right, we'll all go on, then.

But jest as soon as I kin git a horse I'm comin back to see what's goin' on. When the villain saw the girls, who were at the front of the house at the time, he gave a start, while a peculiar light shone in his eyes.

I've heard tell of 'em. There's a heathen, too. He's one of the party, I reckon. I am very dazed. I got a rap on the head with something not long ago and I haven't recovered from it yet.

I suppose it was the Gulcll Gang who attacked me But Gregory hardly heard what he said, for he was now shaking hands with the driver and asking him all sorts of questions.

Arietta came forward, and Anna and Eloise were not Jong in following. They were anxious to know what had become of Wild and I.

But Zeb Holcomb had so much to tell about the hold-up that it was some little time before they could get any information. Finally the card-sharp turneti to them and, doffing his hat, said: "Lddies, I take it that you are anxious to know something concerning Young Wild Wes t and his pards.

Thon he told his story, acting as though he sympathized greatly with them as he die! Anna was dismayed when she learned that Charlie had dis appeared in such a mysterious fashion cheerfully ever since they arri'ved, eve n though she felt badly over the hold-up and the non-appearance of the driver.

But he had arrived now, and no one was hurt, so that put a different aspect upon things. However, the story the card-sharp told had considerable effect upon her, especia lly when she saw how an:r.

Jack Duncan was what might be called a rather ,; fresh" man, if nothing e lse. He showed plainly that h e liked the society of the girls, and h e talked on almost every subject until they became tired of him.

Every now and then Anna would go out upon the rickety old porch and look for tidings of her husband and his partners.

Finally Arietta became tired of the man's company and she started for the kitchen, where Mrs. Gregory was preparing dinner for them.

Maybe I can help you out a little. Let mo go with you. Probably we can hurry matters along a little.

Why, I thought my company was quite agreeable. I l go on out, then. But never mind, little girl. I shall remember this. Hop wn. This man seems to be rather fr esh, though.

Some peo p le are cow ardly, though. But it was not the first time anything like that had hap-pened, and since Wild and Jim were looking for h im, she "See here, girl," the card-sharp spoke up, angrily, "I've ho1;ed and trusted that everything would be all right.

Please drop the subject. Her conclusion was that there was something wrong about "You gittee outtee here! Duncan thrust himself upon their company and even f ollo wed Completely cowed, and not a little frightened, Duncan the m when they went into the house.

The Hal f-way House was an old-fashioned structure, and l ''Me fixee velly muchee quickoe, Missee Alietta," Hop said, had been used before it became a station for the stagecoach with a grln.

Me gottee no bulline as a ranch-house. Pletty soonee But the grazing had grown poorer every year, and the owner me shootee, and!

Arietta could not help laughing now, even though she had However, it was all that was required for the purpose, and been somewhat angered by the manner of the rascally man.

Dan Gregory's wife usually served meals to those want! Il'g "I honestly bell eve," she said, nodding to Anna and Eloise, them while the horses were being changed.

I have met such Very few 11;1,p! He is somewh:. How many True, there were quite a few miners who had their wives times have we seen it that way before, girls?

He velly muchee bad Mellcan certain thing sll. Me knowee lat," was the reply. Whiie I hardly think that Charlie is in any Along the trail the brave girl went at a gallop, the Chinagrrnt dange r, be may have been caught by the Gulch Gang, as man keeping close to her, and soon they were lost to the view they call it.

But that don't rrean that he is going to stay of those standing on the porch. Just then the mistress of the house came into the room But th ey knew pretty well how far they had to go, for the and with a smile, said: stage-driver had specified the exact spot when he was telling "'Are you ladies going to eat now, or do you prefer to wait Gregory about the hold-up until your friends come back?

He is a rather fresh fellow, the best of her. Do you know who be is? He ment. But I have an idea that I length neared the spot where the guard of the stagecoach lay be is something wor se t oo, if it were known.

J 'Tbunderation! But I s'pose I know. You're loo kin' for Young Wild who did not seem t6 know just what to do. I West. Allee h?

There ain't no use of you stayin' around Then be tipped his hat to the girls and called out: here. You couldn't do no good, anyhow.

I s'pose maybe "Now, then, I'll go and see if I can find Young Wild West Young Wild West an' his pard has got on the track of the outand help him rescue bis partner from the Gulch Gang.

I feel laws, an' most likely they're miles from here jest now. That's the be rewarded with a kiss from one of you. I heartily as be did so.

That gal's got more "Hop," said Arietta, the moment the villain bad ridden away pluck in her than most men has," Zeb declared, and then, from the house, "go and saddle my horse as quickly as you shaking his bead as though he could not quite understand can.

I want to follow that fellow. Me go, too, so be. Me velly When be had disappeared around the turn, Arietta nodded smar. I am going to look around "Where are YOU gain', gal?

If it shou ld happen that I am seen by any of the following the Chinaman in the direction of the shed where 1 : vlllains they will not harm me very much, I know.

But if the horses had been tied. I call for help I want you to get to me as quickly as pos I ii,m going to lock for Young Wi ld West," was the reply.

Maybe you can't save me if I do get caught, but y ou 'Pshaw! Don't do it, gal. Stay right here That boy can find out wh e re they take me to knows putty w e ll bow to take care of himself.

He'll turn up Me undelstanrlec Missce Alietta," the ChinamRn said, as all right, an' so will his pards. Bt:t I have got it in my bead to go, and I s tePd '"Me do whattce you say.

Then Hop who had no int PAGE 9 8 YOUNG WILD WEST'S RISKY TIIDE. Hop really feared that Charlie had been captured, but he was still of the opinion that Wild and Jim we r e somewhere about, searching fer him, if they had not already found him.

He stepped over to the spot where Jhe deu l man had been lying b eside the boulder The blanket that bad coYered the body was still there, for Zeb Holcomb had not seemed desirous of taking it with him.

As the Chinaman stood there looking about and listening, h e suddenly detected a light footfall.

Acting on a sudden impulse, he dropped upon the ground and, stretching himself out upon his back, he drew the blanket ov e r him.

He was not a moment too soon In doing this, for a man stepped cautiously into view, though Hop could not see him just then.

Then the footfalls of another were he,ard, and as the two came and stood within a few feet of him the prostrate Chinaman managed to get a look at them through a small hole in the blanket.

You had to be mighty careful about gittin' in with your horse, too, 'cause you seen him up that way. But who could he have been talking to?

Folks does that once in awhile. I do it myself, new an' ag'in. But I wonder why he didn't take the body with him? He seemed to be anxious about getting it over to the Half-way House.

Most likely he expected to find them two boys what come to look for their pard. I wonder where they are now, anyhow? They'll never find our cave, that's certain.

We've got Cheyenne Charlie hard and fast inside, and before night we'll have the other two. Young Wild West is the one I want to get most of all.

If we can only get the three of them, Dutch, we will have accomplished a great thing. Those fellows have done more to break up gangs like ours than any ten men in the whole United States.

Young Wild West Is only a boy, and one of his pards is, too. But they seem to know a whole lot more than a great many men. As far as the fellow we have got ifside is concerned, he don't know a whole lot, any more than to fight like a wildcat whenever he gets the least chance to do it.

Hop remained perfectly silent. He feared almost to breathe, lest they might see the blanket rise and fall. But they did not s eem to be looking at it very closely, and holding his cigar so the smoke might escape by the end of the boulder, he waited and watched.

Suddenly he heardJootsteps approaching. The two men started and pulled their guns. A sudden fear came over the Chinaman, for he knew right away that it must be Arietta coming back.

But he was quick to think and act. He always carried some of these, as those acquainted with the adventures of Young Wild West know quite well.

He moved his hand with the cracker until he got it close to the other end. The footsteps sounded nearer, and he noticed that the two men stepped up close to the cliff and crouched Presently ono of them started up and called out: "Pleased t0 meet you, Miss Arletta.

I told you we might meet again soon. That shows that she was only fooling when she got so hateful at the Half-way House. Well, well! I am really surprised.

I am not a member of the Gulch Gang at all. I happened to meet this man, who Is a friend of mine. He is just as anxious to locate the whereabouts or the Gulch Gang as I am.

But say, you really showed a great deal of courage in following me here. What was your obj e ct, little girl? Now, then, suppose you give me that kiss I spoke about as I rode away from the Half-way House.

There is no ne ed of resisting, for it will do you no good. I reckon you don't want much to do with her. She would jes t as leave shoot you as eat, I honestly believe.

I hate to hurt yer, but if you don't, I'll have to break your arm with a bullet. I've got yer dead to ri ghts, though you can't see me.

Unconsciously, she lowered the revolv e r and, watching his chance, Jack Duncan sprang forward and knocked it from her hand. A loud explosion sounded right behind him, and then the blanket was thrown aside and Hop Wah leaped to his f eet.

As quick as a flash, the Chinaman seized the girl by the arm and half dragge d her from the spot, r;oing toward the waiting horses CHAPTER V. WILD AXD JBI OE'l' l: PAGE 10 YOUNG WILD WEST 'S RISKY RIDE.

I hardly thin! Come on "It looks that way, Jim. I It was day li ght, too, and this made him feel that it was Finally they turne d and r ode slowly back.

When they were within abo u t fifty yards of the place where "It's only about thirty fe e t down the re, Jim," he said, with they had met the villainous gambler they halted and promptly a nod of his h e ad.

Now, then, you just let me down. Lowe r dismoun ted. If I give two pull s y ou view of any one who might pass along the trail, and they were will know that everything is all right and I have landed no J long in leadin g them to it.

But the r e is hardly any n ee d of me telling y o u t h i s, Now, then," our b,ero said, in his cool and easy way, while for it is the same old signal we have always used.

If there's an underground r e ndezvous any-where he might brace himself to lower away when the time where around here they certainly must have a fire in it somecame.

We have discovered such place s before In that way, S eeing that he was all ready, Wild promptly threw his legs Jim, s o we'll look for s om e op ening that smoke has been passov e r the edge of the fis sure ing through at some time or other.

I'm pretty sure the horses will be "Don't make any more noise than you can help, Wild," safe until we get back. Dart said. Undoubtedly, they have captur e d It was tedious work for the most part, but the two b o ys were Charlie, and it is for us to free him as soon as possib l e active and muscular, and it did not take them a great while to Slowly andstead!

As it was, it covered quite a broad scope, going back! At first h e could not hear the l east sound, but after waiting They covered a couple of hundred yards in this way, but for nearly a minute an occa sional thud came to his ears.

The horses of the outlaws were somewhere clo s e by, for he But they were not through yet, and striking a course that was w e ll satisfied that quite a wall of rock lay between.

But quite a little light came through it, especially at one Just about half-way across the stretch they came to a rather end wide crack which extended in zig-zag fashion for perhaps Be low was a yawning chasm, looking as though it might ex twenty or thirty feet.

Young Wild West came to a halt Instantly and sniffed the The boy glance d downward, and then shook his head. I reckon we' ve found it, Jim h e said, coolly.

If "Yes,' was the reply. I'll take a bunt around. His sharp eyes soo n discovered where the smoke was in the It seemed as if the underground place was complet e ly shut habit of com ing "from, for the edges of the fissure were blackoff from the part that must be occupied by the Gulch Gang ened at eithe r side.

Dropping upon hi s knees, Wild undertook to peer downWild went o ve r to where the rope was hanging and looke d w a rd.

But he could see nothing, for, no doubt, the crack ran in Then it did not take him long to see that there was an o b -anything but straight fashion.

L e t me see that rope you were He adjusted the rope about his body, and then gave the 8'g-t hou ghtful enough to bring with you. Not exa c tl y thoughtful, Wild," Dart answered, with a smile, The next minute h e was rising slowly, for Dart was qui tie and s peakin g in a low t one of voice "It ls force of habit.

You strong enough to perform the taslr. A rope edge of the rock and helped himself to get upon the solid g e!

But n eve r mind. I sup "Well, how did you make out? Try to get down there by means of the rope. I want you to lower me do wn.

But I am not walled off from the one the gang is located in, I could hear g oiag d o wn wh e re all this black soot I s I don't care to b e the o ccasional stamp of horses' hoofs, but that was al l.

I mt,! I think so too, Wild. The fissure was not more than two feet in width here, but Wild was satisfied that it widened further down. He found this to be correct, for Jim had not lowered him more than ten feet when he discovere d that he had plenty of room.

But it was not straight down, and as the rocks were very sharp in places, h e feared that the rope might be cut.

However, he was willing to take the risk, and slowly but surely he ,ent on downward. It was further than thirty feet, too, but Jim's rope was quite long enough, and when at last the boy's feet tou-:hed the ground in a very dark place he look ed upward and failed to see anything, though a faint light show e d above him, of course.

But this was due to the fact that the rift in the midst of rock and earth was irregular. Wild gave the necessary signal to let Jim know that he had landed all right, and then once more he removed the rope from his body.

Stepping a few feet along through the darkness, he came to the 10ugh side of a. Then h e paused and listened. He could hear the stamping of hoofs mor, e plainly now, but as he waited a minute or two he heard something that pleased him be.

It was the indistinct sounds rcade by voices. I'll soon find out if Charlie is here or not. If he is, I must find a means of getting him free, Thero may be a whole lot of the villains here, and if that is the case it would hardly do for me to open fire on them, for I couldn't male my escape quickly enough should they get after me too hot.

Pgh," he thought. Now, the n, how am I going to get him out oe here? There are seven determined villains to contend with, I might shoot down four or five of them b efore they had a chan ce but I won't do that.

I reckon I'd betLer go back and ge t Jim to come down. Then if we can find a way to get out of here into the gulch it will be all right.

He had no means of letting Jim know what h e wanted him to do without calling out to him, anC. E-way to the top he called out, softly: "Jim, l e t m e down again and th n yo u come on down.

I reckon it will be all r i ght, for we'll get out by the other way. I have fo End the hiding-place of the scoundrels, and have seen Charlie, They h::tvc got him bound hand and foot in a corner.

Come en down as soon as I givo tho signal to let you know that I have landed safely. He waited until Jim came down the rope, doing it with the greatest of c ase.

But it's all right. But he relied upon his coolness and good judgment to over-He coiled up the pieces of rnpe that had dropped down, as come any difficulties that might appear before him, and after he did so, and when Wild was ready, the two started to go again listening and locating the direction the sounds came around to that part of the underground place that was use d from, ho felt his way along through the darkness, being careful as a headquarters by the band of road-agents.

I reckon I can manage to creep In there and cut Charlie whose voi ces he had heard, so he resolutely stevped around loose. It strikes me that the passage over there is the way it and was soon standing where he could see obj ects quite well, to get out.

It's dark to the left, 50 I reckon we'll both try it. The voices were quite plain now, and he could distinguish If we can manage to get Chatlic out wiLhout them knowing some of the words, and knew that the men were talking in it, it wiil be all the better, for then all we'll have to do is to low tones, as if they feared they might be heard from the out-find the way out, and we can come back and bring three or side, four with us to help and soon corral the gang.

In use some little time by the villains, He crept along noisel essly, for he was 'l': ell used to that sort He counted the men there, and found there were seven of of thing.

But he knew he would surely make more or less nofse In Charlie was reclining, his back against a r ock and his eyes doing it, and before he could get through the villains would fl.

Jim waited, and managed to give an encouraging nod to the relearnd prisoner. N'ot caring to risk speaking, W!

Id shook his head and motioued that they must get out. Of course, the scout knew the way, and he promptly gave an answering nod.

Then he got upon his bands and knees and crawled around, being compel! But once around an angle of rock, and there was the passage which led, crookedly, to the outside.

But the game was more exciting than ever, jus' t now, and the two spectators were just making a wager as to the outcome. The three passed en, and a few seconds later were in the passage.

Once there, Charl! Out through the narrow passage all three went, then, and as they reached the outside and saw the bright sunlight, foey nodded to each other and then gripped hands.

He's all right, Charlie. We took care of him, and he is but a short distance away, with ours. What are you goln' to do now, Wild?

We'll get the horses first and then we'll see what we'll do. Tbey were not long in reaching the spot where the horses had been left. They were there and they found them all right.

Just as they mounted, the clatter of hoofs sounded further down the gulch. It's the opposite direction. I reckon we'll ride on and see who It is.

Before they had gone a distance of a hundred feet a horseman appeared, riding straight toward them. He appeared to be a cowboy, and was coming along at an easy lope.

When he saw the three approaching him he waved his hand and called out: 'Hello, strangers! Which way are you headin'? We have business the other way," Wlld answered.

I'm goin' to take a short cut, an' not bother goin' on through the blamed old gulch. I sartinly do. I kin cut off three-quarters of a mlle, an' that' s a whole lot, 'cause the distance ain't very great, any-how.

That's so. I reckon w e 'll go with you, if you don't object. I reckon I never object to anything like that. You two boys an' your pard there seems to be all right.

I left Hard Bottom early this mornin', an' I'm dead broke. That's why I want to git to the Half-way House, 'cause I know Dan Gregory will let me have what I want to eat, an' give me a five-dollar bill till pay-day comes.

Come on, if you're goin' by the short way. You turn right here. But when Young Wild West and hls partners looked at the ground and saw the prints of horses' hoofs they knew pretty well that It must go further than that, since horsemen certainly had been in the habit of passing that way.

The cowboy, for such he was, rode on, talking away at a great rate about the llig time he had experienced in Hard Bottom the night before. I only hau forty-two dollars when I started in to buck the tiger over there," he said.

Then I commenced to lose. Like every body else what fools wllh a faro lay-out, I kept on until I went dead broke. But It's all right.

I'll go back ag'in when I git paid next month. I'm game, I am. Wild knew there was no use in trying to give him advice, for such men rarely take It.

He found the cowboy's name was Hecker, and he judged him to be a pretty good fellow beyond the fact that he was a confirmed gambler.

The short cut proved to be all rlght, for It brought them out within a couple of hundred yards of the rear of the Half-way House.

None of us has had dinner yet. Arietta and Hop left here not mere than ten minutes ago. They went to look for you. What did she want to do tl::at for?

I suppose she got it in her head that something was wrong, and she's simply started off, thinking she might be of some assistance.

Since I have waited so long, I think I can stick it out until a little later for my dinner. Jim cried, as he turned to his horse and quickly mounted again.

It don't make no difference how hungry I am, we've got to go an' see where Arietta an' Hop is. If they started out after that sheakin' coyote, the chances are they'll run into trouble.

Most likely he"s goin' straight off to the cave, where I was layln' tied hand an foot for quite a little while. But Wild an' Jim got me all right, an' here I am.

Don't you be afraid, 'cause they ain't gain' to git me ag'in. We'll fix 'em this time, an' don't you forgit it. Wild turned to the cowboy who had ridden to the Half-way House with him, and, with a nod, said: "Hecker, i: reckon if you take a notion you can r-ide out to the gulch after you have had your dinner.

You might help a little. Just get Gregory and his man to come, too. I reckon the stage-driver ls somewhere around.

If you tell him about it he'll certainly wa1,1t to come and lend his assistance. I think that with two or thre of you we'll be able to corral the Gulch Gang.

But go ahead and get something to eat. You have been without your breakfast and dinner long enough. You'll find us somewhere, I think. He was really quite anxious about his sweetheart and the Chinaman.

He quickly mounted Spitfire, and then rode away with Charlie and Jim, who had already started. Along the trail they rode at a smashing clip, and not until PAGE 13 12 YOUNG WILD WEST'S RISKY RIDE.

Then they gradually drew down to a walk, and in this way went on until they thought ttiey were close enough to go wi t h the horses.

Dismounting, they left the animals standing and made their way, cautiously, ahead, eac h holding a revolver in readiness In case any of the villains should suddenly appear.

Not the least sign of any one couid they s ee nor cou ld they hear a sound that would indicate that there was any one wit :lin a mile of the place.

Reaching the big boulder near which the body of the stagecoach gi. It was in a confused heap, and was torn and blackened som ewhat. Sorter lool,s as t hou gh it was on fire," Charlie observed "'Probabl y it was.

But we won't try to find out anything about it just now We have got to look for Arietta and Hop. But they could not find the girl and the Chinaman, or their horses, either.

There were so many hoof-prints on the trail that It was impossible to tell if they had gone past the place or not. Finally Wild decided to go on a little fltl'ther, for it occurred to him that Arietta might have proceeded on, since he knew pretty well that the Gulch Gang could easily have missed seeing her and the Chinaman ride p ast, for they were quite a distance back under the grom1d.

Going back to their horses, the three mounted and then rod e along the trail untl! When they had made an examination of the ground they flecame convinced that the missing two bad not gone in that direction, since the only fresh hoof-prints were those made by the cowboy's horse, and they were leading that way.

It is too bad, but I can't help feeling that way 'Let's go an' git 'em, then, Wild. There ain't no use In wattin' about I t.

The quicker we do it the sooner we'll have a chance to git somethin' to eat," the scout said, resolutely. All right, come on.

Just then they beard the sounds made by horses coming through the narrow place they bad used for a short cut to r each the Half-way House when they accompanied the cowboy.

Young Wild West stood by his horse, a revolver in his hand, and waited, while neither Charlie nor Jim said a word. The next moment who should appear but Hop Wah.

He was riding his own horse and leading Arietta's, and appeared to be quite disturbed over something. Missee Alietta gittee ketchee by um bad Mell ca n men.

THE EXPLOSIO IN TIIE CAl"E. Hop Wah cer. When he seized the girl by the arm to l ead her out of the s moke toward the horses, he surely felt that he was going to get her away from them.

But, unfortunately, he ran right into a rock that happened to be in the way and was forced to let go of her to escape falling to the ground.

Arietta gave an involuntary cry, and then DutC'h Perry, the leader of the gang, sprang forward and caught her by the arm. I clon't know what i n thunder it was that made that explosion, but, j est the same, you ain't goin' to git away.

Come back here. She must have had a stick of dynamite somewhere an' she chucked it on a rock. She'll tell all about it later on.

But let's git her Inside the cave. That's the thing to do now. But he bad no sooner reached the animals than he realize d his mistake.

He should have remained there and seen where the villains took the girl. But It was too late now, though he did creep back and look around. But wh e n h e got there, there was no one to be seen.

There lay the blanket In a h eap, just as he had thrown it as the hig cracker exploded. It was ,smok ing, for the explosion bad set it on fire in a few places.

But Hop did not care what happened to the blanket, so he soon left it and then once more went back to the horses.

Me no wantee go back now, so be Maybe ley gottee Misler Wild and his partners. Velly muchee bad. Me-no likee.

But he had marked well the spot where he had last seen the two villains and the girl, and thinking it best to go on past It with the ho rses, he did so, going slowly so as to net make any unnecessary noise.

He continued on until he came to the narrow cut that had been used by our hero and his partners when they went with the cowboy to the Half-way House.

Hop did not know it was a short cut to the place. He simply toolc it for a good hiding-place for the horses, so he led them In for a few yards, and then sat down to study the situation again.

The more be thought about it the more worried he beca21e. Everything pointed to the fact that Wild and his partners had fallen Into the hands of the Gulch Gang, and that being the case, things were In a desperate strait.

Luckily, none of the villains happened to be on the watch just then, for If they bad been they might easily have taken hlm by surprise and made him a prisoner.

Finally, Hop decided upon doi'ng exactly what Wild and Jim bad done when they found themselves completely balked.

He started to climb up to the top of the cliff. When he finally got there he rested long enough to regain his breath, and then crept to the edge and looked over.

It happened just-then that one of tne gang was outsicfe, lookIng up and down the trail. Hop saw him and was much plea sed when he did.

The villain soon satisfied himself that there was no one about, and then he turned and walke d back to the face of the cliff and quickly disappeared.

Marking the spot well in his mind, Hop started to get down again, for he now felt that he had found where Arietta had been taken.

Instead of d escending to the trail he found that he C'Oulcl ge t around to the spot where ho had left the hor ses and h' ac cordingly went that way.

It was a rocky s lope he had to f! Bnt tbe first thing he did was to tell the what had hap pened. Me tly velly hard to stoppee, I ness and soon reached the passage that ended in that part o f but me do lat.

Velly bad," and he shook his head, sadly. I the underground place that was occupied as a headquarters b y "Go on and tell us all about it, and be quick about it.

Don't 1 the v! Well, it ls not necessary for you to tell it, because we But otherwise she seemed to be perfectly herself.

We were all in there. Charlie was a prisoner in the cave and Jim and I have five minutes to make up your mind. The time is u p went in and got him out without the villains knowing it.

If Now, what's your answer? Len you gittee Missee Ali et ta velly muchee quickee. You come with me and fetch a rope with you.

Tack Duncan. He's gone an' fe ll call it. Charlie, you ride back along the trail and meet those! If close to the entrance of the cave, but be careful not to show you don't agree to marry him we're goin' to chuck you over yourself.

Wild was very much pleased to note that the girl had not "Hop and I w,lll get down into the cave, and if you hear an been bound.

Evidently, the villains thought it not necessary, because she All right, Wild," Charlie answered, while Jim gave a nod. Leaving their horses in charge of Charlie and Jim, Wild Of course, they had taken her w e apons from her when they and Ifop walked along until they came to the place where they whisked her into the cave in such a sudden fashion.

Arietta had been frightene d and confused when this hap-OncEJ they got there they looked down, but could see nothing pened, but, true to her nature, she had quickly recovered and of those they had left behind.

Then, 'as the leader had just said within the hearing of our "Yes, I do This one got cut by coming in contact with the hero and the Chinaman, she had been given fiye minutes to sharp rock.

We have got to look out and see that i t don't render a final decision. Now, then, let me see the rope. They were simply trying to frighten her and force her to ''Now then, :flop," the boy said, coolly, "I am going down, give her consent.

Do you understand? I have "'You have got a couple of big firecrackers with y o u, I sup-heard you say that the prisoner you had 'here escaped in some pose?

You know what that means, or you ought Yes, me gottee four. He will surely find Young Wild West and come "All right. You may have a chance to use one of them beback.

I haven't the least doubt but that they are somewhere fore very long. You are a He was a little anxious about him, for he feared that the set of cowardly villains, and you will soon be caught dead to rope mlght have chafed sufficiently to break.

Wild was quite thrilled by his sweetheart's word,s, but he When Hop had it in his mind to create an explosion he In-did not b ec ome exc ited, and d ec ided that now was the time variably smoked a cigar.

This was to enable him to be ready at a moment's notice He nodded to the Chinaman, who qi. Jicl;:ly produced a big to touch off a fuse.

Instead of permitting the Chinaman to hurl the cracker Wild said nothing to this, for h e knew quite well that some into the cave, wild took it from him and tossed it across the of the v!

The sound as the cracker struck the rocky floor caused s ome Yes, Misler Wild, me allee l e ddy, so be. There is no n ee d of telling you to be But they did not have a chance to see what it was, for at mighty careful how you tread.

PAGE 15 YOUNG WILD WEST'S RISKY RIDE. Wllrt started to rush in, intending to get h i s sweetheart by the arm and hurry out of the cave with her.

But there was a heavy thud before h e had taken t"ro strps, and down crashed tons of earth and rock effect ually block-ing the opening.

This had been undoubtedly caused by the shock from the ex p l osion and the young deadshot and the clever Chinee had b een balked just as they were upon the threshol d ofl success.

CHAPTER VIII. He dragged h0r out into the cave rather roughly, and looking her squarely In the eyes, excl:. If you do you'll be sorry for it.

If you have got any more d ynamite about you loo', out how you handle it. You must suffer yonrself to be searched, fo r I don't mean to take any further ri sk.

ARIET'rA's PERIL. But nothing was found, and, satisfied that it was all right The villains in the cave were certainl y an astoun ded lot now, he tm"ned lo his companion and said: when the explos ion rang out.

Young Wild wes t The rumbling of the fallen earth and rock added to tlJ. We'll terror of the situation. I ride out by the back way and take to the canyon and go on Arletta a l one understoo d what it all meant, for many times until we find a good place fer an ambush.

They' ll follow us, had Hop caused simllar exp losion s before. Come on, Dutch. Just then two of the men came hurrying into the cave from Eut owing to the smoke and confusion, she failed to find a passage.

How dare you talk to me like that! Don't you know that you are very near death now? Young Wild West surely will shoot you the moment he gets within range.

Can't you see that we've got things our own way now? Any one who comes along kin be s ee n by us an' they can't see us.

Jest wait till that kid comes lookin' for yer. You'll see hov, quiclc I'll pop him over. Perhaps you have the idea that because Young Wild West is only a boy he will be foolish enough to ride up and let you shoot him down.

Don't you believe anything like that. He'll find a way to surprise you. He has done such things many times before, and he won't fail now. She's got too much spunk for that.

Why, I believe she would turn on yer an' put a knife in yer if she got mad. You fellows just lceep a watch and we'll have the marriage ceremony performe d right now After 1t is done she won' t dare to oppose me a great deal.

Come here, Sneaky Dic k Perhaps the ugliest and dirtiest-looking rum. Sneaky Dick," said Duncan, looking from Arietta to him and nodding his head, "you used to be a preacher, didn't you?

Dut I reckon I kin perform a marriage ceremony all right, an' it will be as bindin' an' lawful as if any one else done Jt. No such man as Sneaky Dick could possibly have been a preacher at any time.

She knew, too, that the gambler was simply trying to have a mock-marriage performed, no doubt thinking she would regard it as binding. Sneaky Dick seemed to regard it as a great joke, though he kept l ooking over his shoulder as though he feared the girl's friends might suddenly appear in the gulch.

Go ahead, Sneaky. The bride le willing, though she is so badly worked up that she might say she isn't.

It maltes no difference whether she answers in tl. Proceed with the ceremony," "Wait till I find my book," the villain answered, with a lat;gh. We'll wait.

But I har. Go ahead, Dick. For an answer the g irl made a desperate struggle and, breaking away from her captors momentarily, she struck the bogus preacher full in the face with her clenched fist, sending him rolling against the rock.

I give up the job, Jack. You ll have to lcok for somebody else to tie the knot. This Is what I call a regular circus," observed Dutch Perry, who seemed to be enjoying the trouble his friend was having with the girl.

Things are going to work out my way, though, just the same. I suypose we may as well lie low until Young Wild West and his pards show up.

Then after we have cleaned them out we'll ride over to the Halfway House and fix up things there. We may as well make a thorough job of it, too.

There are a few there who will probably put up a fight, but it won't talrn long to dean them out. Then, for satisfaction, we'll burn the old house to the ground, after taking all we can find in.

That's the only way I can figure it out now. But it won't be a great while before it ls discovered, for after doing what we propose, every man within fifty or sixty miles of here will be looking for us.

The best thing we can do is to leav e and go to some other place. All right, then," was the reply. Arietta was feeling a trifle mere easy now.

She really felt that the worst of it was over, for she was firmly convinced that it would not be very long before her dashing young lover would come to her rescue.

CHAPTER IX. THE GULCH OAXO IS LOCATED. They held their rifles in readiness, expecting some of the But the bullet simply went past his h e ad, and before she Gulch Gang to appear from the cave.

Things ls putty meant to kill me. When you're my wife I'll take It upon we]] mixed up, I reckon. Perhaps I wlll be compelled to beat ''They are, Charlie.

I can't understand why the scoundrels you a llttle. Some men do that to their wives, you know, when don't come running out, for Hop certainly caused ti.

Wild I Arietta shrieked, as she tried to tear herself "Well, Jim, there's more than one way of glttln' out of that away from the villains.

You know as well as I do that they don't But a hand was quickly clapped over her mouth, and she take the horses In or out from here.

There's another way to was pulled bnck behind n big rock. But we'll "Come on, Jack," Sneaky Dick cailed out. I want to hurry this thing along.

If with Arietta. I'm goln' to marry you an' the gal, I want to do it right away, They did wait for perhaps fifteen minutes and then sud-'cnuee there'll be somethln' else gain' on afore long an' I'm denly they heard the clatter of hoofs.

Once ruore Arletta became comparatively cool. I As they turned and looked in that direction they soon saw I nearly got you that time, you fiend!

PAGE 17 16 YOUNG WILD WEST'S RISKY RIDE. Not far behind him came Zeb Holcomb, the driver of the When he found his partners were there and that the Gulch stagecoach, and Dan Gregory Gang had disappeared, taking Arietta with them, he was some -They rode on up to the waiting two, who had risen to their what disheartened.

Wild called out, loudly: "What was that big noise? It's blocked in his broncho and look ed at the two, eagerly. But who done it? He went there with Young Wild West to pieces of rock.

Let's go in an' find 'em, then. Come on, Jim. Young Wild West was waiting for the opportunity, and he But they went on through without seeing any one, and quickly drew himi;:elf up and crawl ed thr ough.

But where are Wild others to go back to the gulch and Hop? The rest can go outside and remain tbere natura l. The fir s t thing to do Is to find out whether "Who's that?

We ought to be able to find that out quickly enough, for in "Here we are, Charlie! In the brief account of the war in the Crimea, I would acknow- ledge most gratefully the assistance of a distinguished officer of engineers, whose information, gained by personal observation of the military operations in that country, is of peculiar value.

WmPowT, April, PART I. ANGIBNT BRITAIN. OMAPm PAOS L— VHX LAKD AND ITS nrSABITAIfTS. U PART II. THB NORMAN OONQUEST. T PART IV. OBAFRE tMM XL—EMSn L— 0TSPHXN— TSX BROTHXK'S WAR— DOMISnO 80RB0W— XFFORTS TO SCOURS THK 8U0CX88I0N TO MATILDA— flURHAKlfr— cirawAR Xn.

TT-M XIV. XTL— KINQ JOHK. ENGLAND DURING THE FIFTEENTH OENTUBT. COMFORT— GRXAT MBBCHANTS— MANNXRS AND OUSTOMS— CONIOnOH 07 THX PXOPLX PART VIII.

INQLAND DURING THE SIXTEENTH CENTURT — LA STUART. ORD PRQTSOTOR. LTIL— m nrouiB niiRsiA. ANCIENT BRITAIN.

CHAPTER I. BRITAIN BEFORE THE ROMAN CONQUEST. In the Atlantic Ocean, somewhat to the north-west of the mainland of Europe, lies the island of Great Britain.

The first inhabitants of whom we have any certain knowledge were of the Celtic race, and were in a rude and barbarous conditioD.

At first, their island was called Albion, which means " The White Isle," but afterwards it was better known 10 HISTORY OF ENGLAND. Their merchant vessels passed beyond the Pillars of Hercules for so the ancients named the -;8tFait8 of.

Perhaps the brazen sea and vessels " of bright brass," wrought by Tyrian workmen for King Solomon's Temple at Jerusalem, were made in part ai British tin.

Britain was a cold country, and the people, excepting those on the southern coast, knew very little about cultivating the ground. They lived upon the milk and flesh of their flocks and herds, or upon wild fruits.

They had no towns. The savage Britons in the middle of the island wore very little clothing. They tattooed their skins, somewhat in the manner of the South Sea islanders, and painted them with woad, a plant which yields juice of a blue color.

The more civilized people of the coast wore trousers and tunics made of chequered cloth, of various colors, the chief and favorite stripe being red.

This dress resembled the tartan-plaid of the Highlanders. These ornaments, as also their dyed cloth, prove that the southern Britons knew something of manufactures.

They made metal rings which they used for money, and drinking- vessels and urns of coarse earthenware.

The Britons were divided into numerous petty tribes, and BRITAIN BEFORE THE ROMAN CONQITXST. Their weapons were broadswords and spears.

At the ehd of the spear waa sometimes fixed a hollow ball filled with pieces of metal, which making a rattling noise when thrown, would frighten the horses of an enemy.

This was a kind of car, breast-high in front and open behind, sometimes of rude structure, and sometimes curiously and beautifully wrought.

To the axle- trees of this car, were fastened scythes and hooks. The chariot was drawn by horses so well trained, that although urged at speed over the roughest country, they could be stopped instantly at the voice of the driver.

These chariots, filled with warrior Britons, driven into the midst of the battle, cutting and tearing all before them, spread the greatest terror through the ranks of their enemies.

The shields of the Bri- tons were made of basket-work covered with hides and coated with metal.

Their little walnut-shaped boats, called coracles, were also made of twigs of osier covered with skins. The religion of the Britons, called Druidism, was a strange and cruel superstition.

It was thought that the greater the number of the Druids, the greater would be the prosperity of the country. They became, consequently, a very large and powerful class.

They worshipped in groves of oak watered by fountains or running streams, which were regarded as sacred.

The most remarkable of these Druidical relics now found in Great Britain, are those at Stonehenge in Wilt- shire, and the curious cromlech known as Kits Coty House, Aylesford in Kent.

The DroidB taught the people to believe that Ood loved the oak more than all other trees of the wood, and that whatever was found growing upon it came from heaven.

Especially, they looked upon as sacred the mistletoe plant, whenever its white berries were found clustering upon the gnarled branches of this monarch of the wood.

When they were so fortunate as to find it, a procession with great pomp and ceremony advanced to the sacred tree.

A white-robed Druid climbed the oak, and cut with a gold knife the mistletoe bough, which was caught as it fell in the white garment of another Druid.

Then followed festive rites and rejoicings. In the sacrifices of the Druids, human victims frequently suffered.

Instances are recorded of men and ani- mals thrown together into a huge wicker-work cage, and burned in offerings to the false gods of this cruel religion.

Besides the festival above mentioned, there were three other important holydays observed by the Druids : — May-Day, Mid- summer Eve, and the last day of October.

In their worship of the Sun and Moon was included the adoration of fire. On May-Day Eve, fires were lighted and sacrifices offered to obtain a Medsing on the newly-sown fields.

And when, at Mid- summer, the fruits of the earth were becoming ready for the gathering, and on All Hallow's Eve, when the harvest was ended, night-fires blazing on moor and mountain, marked the celebration of each Druid festival.

The religion of these Pagans has long since passed away, and yet, says an English writer, many traces of their old superstition still linger in the popular sports and pastimes of the people.

One part of their education, was the learning of a great number of verses by heart, for they were not allowed to commit their knowledge to writing.

They were taught astro- nomy, and must have been well skilled in mechanics, to have reared those ponderous stones and huge cromlechs, the mere ruins and remains of which, as seen at Stonehenge and other places, fill us with astonishment.

They were taught the arts of eloquence and poetry, and the British bards remained a favored and venerated class long after the rest of their country- men had been subdued or driven from the land.

Name their religion and the objects of its worship. CHAPTER II. Then the Komans were a powerful nation, and had spread the terror of their arms into the countries lying to the north of Italy.

Julius CsBsar, one of their most famous generals, had rabdued the Gauls a people occupying the country now 2 14 HISTORY OF ENGLAND.

Caesar accused the Britons of having helped the Gauls to fight against him, hut the real motive of his intended expedi- tion was prohably a desire to carry his arms into a new country ; and in the summer, or early autumn of the above- mentioned year, Julius Caesar, with a fleet of eighty vessels, and an army of twelve thousand men, crossed the channel.

On approaching the cliffs of Dover, the Romans saw them covered with fierce armed Britons. Caesar, finding it impos- sible to land in the face of the bold rocks and bolder enemy, gave orders to sail further along the coast, to a place where the shore was less abrupt.

The Britons, with their war- chariots and horses, flew to the spot, determined if possible to prevent his landing anywhere.

The Roman fleet proceeded to Deal, and there Caesar prepared to disembark his troops. The water was very deep, and the fierce enemy was on the shore.

I at least will do my duty to Caesar and to the Republic! Leaping into the sea, they effected a landing, and after a sharp conflict drove the Britons from the beach.

The latter promised submission, but a severe storm having destroyed the Roman ships, the Britons soon broke into rebellion. They were again defeated, and sued for peace, which was granted to them on very easy terms; for the Romans, having repaired a few vessels of their disabled fleet, were anxious, as winter approached, to return to Gaul.

The islanders united under a brave chief, Caswallon, and did their utmost to defend their country. Several battles THE ROMAN C0NQUS8T. Caesar again made peace with the islanders and returned to Gaul, having discovered rather than conquered Britain.

After the departure of Julius Ceesar, Britain was left in peace; that is, there was no enemy from abroad, but the savage tribes were at war very often among themselves.

At length, when nearly one hundred years had gone by, in the year of our Lord 48, Roman legions, under Aulus Plautius, again entered Britain.

The Britons, united under their chief Caradoc or Caractacus, for nine years strove to drive the invaders from the A.

Many fierce conflicts occurred. On a hill A. It was bravely contested, but the numbers and discipline of the Romans won the day. Caractacus was treacherously delivered into the hands of his enemies, and carried in chains to the imperial city.

There, standing before Caesar's judgmenlMeat, his noble spirit shone forth. His wife and children, awed by the presence of the emperor, pleaded for mercy.

Caractacus rebuked with calm dignity the proud and wicked ambition of his conquerors. He caused his chains, as well as those of his wife and children, to be struck off.

Whether his captors ever had the generosity to restore Caractacus to his native land, historians have not told us. It is said that the " Claudia" whom St.

Paul mentions in his Second Epistle to llmothy, was a daughter of Caractacus, and was ootiverted to 16 HI8TOBT Of XNOLAMD. Christianity through the influence of the wife of the Roman general, Aulus Plautius.

The contest was still kept up in Britain, and many brave Roman armies were sent thither. Between the years 59 and. The Britons did their utmost to defend this sacred island : armed men crowded the beach; women with streaming hair and flaming torches and piercing cries ran in among them, whilst Druids with lifted hands and frantic gestures uttered curses on the daring invaders.

It was all in vain. The Romans, in flat-bottomed boats crossed the Menai Straits, burned the Druids in the very fires they had kindled for their enemies, and cut down the sacred groves.

While Suetonius was engaged in this expedition, the eastern Britons had risen aa:ainst the Romans.

Her countrymen flocked to her standard. Soon a Roman colony was laid in ashes, and London city of ships , then a small but prosperous trading town, was plundered and its inhabitants put to death.

Other colonies were attacked, and seventy Ihousand victims fell a sacrifice to British ven- geance. Suetonius, at the first intelligence of this rising, hurried from the west, and soon Queen Boadicea met her foes in battle.

Mounted in her war-chariot, her long yellow hair streaming in the wind, she exhorted her followers to avenge her wrongs and those of their country.

But her efforts and her heroism were of no avail. The Britons were defeated, and their unhappy queen put an end to her life by swallowing poison.

From A. He taught the people many of the arts of civilization ; induced them to for- sake their rude huts and build comfortable houses, and taught their youth the language of Rome.

He carried the Romui THS ROMAN CONQUEST. Here he met the Caledonians ; a people whom he never con- quered, although he fought many hattles with them.

The southern part of Britain had now A. Many generals marched into Scotland, and two emperors, Hadrian and Severus, after in vain trying to conquer these fierce people, built ramparts and A.

This rampart served to keep back the barbarians, and fpr nearly seventy years after its erection, Boman Britain enjoyed peace. The son of Severus granted the Britons the privileges of Koman citizenship.

During the fourth century the Picts, a tribe of Caledonians, and the Scots, a people who had come from Ireland, rushing like birds of prey from the mountain fastnesses of Scotland, broke over the wall of Severus, laid waste the country beyond, and even advanced into the southern provinces of Britain.

The Romans drove them back as lone as they to Barbarians from the forests of Germany and Hungary were pouring down upon Gkul, Spain, Italy, and other provinces of her vast empire.

She had need of all her armies for the defence of the imperial city. During the five centuries of their occupation, ihe Bomana had done much to improve the island, and to better the con- dition of the people.

Thej had erected fine broad paved highways throughout the country ; so solid and so well laid, that remains of them are to be seen at the present day.

Towns were built, and the mud or wooden cottages of the early Britons gave place to houses of brick and stone.

The ground was better cultivated, and grain became a plentiful article of export. Long before the Romans came to the island, a trade in tin had been carried on with distant nations, but now the mines were better worked and greater quantities exported.

Oysters were sent to Rome from the shores of Britain, and were esteemed an article of luxury. Pearls too from the same coasts acquired celebrity; Caesar is said to have hung up in the temple of a heathen goddess at Rome, a shield studded with British pearls.

Agricola, who was father-in-law to Tacitus, the famous Roman historian, founded schools, to which the British youth were sent for instruction in the language and literature of Rome.

When they had broken down the altars of the Druids, they too built shrines, to a milder, perhaps, but still to a false religion.

By degrees, as the religion of the Saviour spread, Romans became converted, and among the armies who entered Britain there were no doubt Christian soldiers.

AJban, who TBS ROMAN CONQUB8T. In the year , three British hishops were sent into Gaul to attend there a Christian council — by which we know that Christianity must have been pretty well established in Britain at that time.

The testimony of one of the early Christian Fathers, Clement of Rome, renders it extremely probable that St. Paul himself visited Britain.

But, though we have no certain knowledge respecting the missionaries who first carried thither the blessed gospel of Crod, let our hearts ascend in thankful- ness to Him who at this early date permitted its glorious light to dispel the darkness which for so many centuries had brooded over the country.

When and under what general was the island again invaded by the Romans? What benefits were conferred on the Britons by Agricola?

What had been the effect of the Roman occupation upon the island? PART II. CHAPTER III. THE SAXON INVASION. Meanwhile the Picts and Scots, breaking over the wall of Severus, or passing round it in their little coracles, ravaged the land, and bid fair to destroy every trace of civilization which the Romans had left.

The disheartened Britons refused to sow the fields which they knew an enemy would reap, and famine and pestilence spread over the land.

In the depths of their distress an appeal, called " The Groans 8P the Britons," was made to the Romans.

In the year the ships of two Saxon brothers were riding in the English Channel. Their standards bore the figure of a horse, and from two words, both of which are in the Saxon language names for that animal, these bro- thers were called Hengist and Horsa.

On board the Saxon ships there were perhaps three tribes ; the Jutes, the Angles, and the f axons. They all sprang from the same race of Scandinavian pirates which age after age left the shores of the Baltic and North Seas, and were known in successive centuries as Saxons, Banes, and North- men or Normans.

The Jutes, Angles, and Saxons came principally from Denmark, and the country lying to the south and west of that peninsula. They were a fierce race, claiming to be descended from Odin or Woden, a great warrior king whom they worshipped as a god.

The religion of these Northmen was what we might expect of such a people. Their Heaven, or Valhalla, as they called it, was a realm of warriors whose days were passed in fighting, and whose nights were spent in carousals, in which they ate the flesh of a huge boar, and drank great draughts of mead from cups formed of the skulls of their enemies.

Woden, their god of battles, was represented by an image, armed, crowned, and brandishing a drawn sword.

Thor, the god of tempests, of thunder and lightning, held a mace, sometimes called " Thor's mighty hammer. Thus, though so many centuries have gone by, Woden is still remembered in our Wednes or Woden's day, Thor in our Thor's or Thursday, and from Frea, the wife of Odin, is named our Friday.

These tribes delighted in war. Their weapons, spears, swords, and battle-axes, made bf steel, were always kept bright and sharp and ready for use.

Skilled to prepare the raven's food ; Kings of the main, their leaders brare. Their barks the dragons of the wave.

The Saxons gladly accepted a proposal so suited to their tastes, and the Isle of Thanet, now a portion of Kent, was given them for a residence.

Soon they met the Picts and Scots in battle, defeated and drove them back to their moun- tain fastnesses. At a feast given by Hengist to his British host, Rowena, the fair daughter of the Saxon warrior, knelt, and, presenting to Vortigem a golden goblet of wine, said in Saxon words, "Dear king, thy health.

She became his wife, and her influence with her husband brought numbers of her countrymen to the shores of Britain.

Despite the fabled prowess of King Arthur and his knights, and the bravery of many valorous Britons, who for nearly two hundred years kept up the struggle, at the end of that period the Saxon triumphed.

The Britons were driven into other countries, or sougkt reftige amid the wilds of Cornwall or the mountains of Wales. Kent, founded by the son of Hengist; 2.

Sussex, or the kingdom of the South-Saxons ; 3. Wessex, or that of the West-Saxons ; 4. Essex, the possession of the East-Saxons; 5.

East Anglia, conquered by the Angles, North-folk and South-folk, which still give the name to two English shires ; 6. Northumbria, or the country of the people north of the Humber j 7.

Mercia, or the woodland kingdom, which was but partially conquered by the Saxons. The most interesting event in the history of the Heptarchy is the conversion of the pagan Saxons to Christianity.

When the fierce worshippers of Odin and Thor entered Britain, the religion of the Cross was driven from the land, or sought refuge with the conquered people in the mountains of Wales, and in later days amid the rocky islands of the Hebrides.

For a hundred and to But in the providence of Him who delighteth to bring good out of evil, the cruel custom which the Saxons practised of selling their children for slaves, was made the means of introducing the blessings of Christianity into Britain.

In the public market-place of Rome some children were exposed for sale. Gregory, a Roman prior, struck by their bright complexions, fair hair, and beautiful forms, asked whence they came.

A few years before, one of the kings of the Heptarchy, Ethelbert 24 HISTORY OF SNGLAND. He was therefore kindly disposed towards the missionaries, but the pagan priests, who attributed the influence of the Christians to magic, persuaded the king to receive them in the open air, for they believed that he would be safer from their incantations there, than under a roof.

A ruined British Christian church, St. Martin's without the walls of Canterbury, was appropriated to their use, and in a few months King Ethelbert received Christian baptism.

Soon ten thousand of his subjects followed his example. This cheering news so rejoiced the heart of Pope Gregory, that he made Augustin Primate or Archbishop of all England, and appointed Canterbury his Episcopal See.

You will remember that upon the invasion of the Saxons, the Christian church of Britain had sought refuge amid the mountains of Wales.

The new primate now endeavored to secure the alliance and co-operation of these British Christians for the conversion of the pagan Saxons.

Unfortunately his application, coupled with the demand that they should acknow- ledge the supremacy of the Pope, awakened the opposition of the Welsh ecclesiastics.

Other grounds of difference also existed between the parties. Perhaps, too, the Welsh priests were not a little jealous of the success of their Italian brethren.

The zeal of Augustin and his followers certainly put to shame the lukewannness of the British Christians. Seven bishops and an abbot received at Bangor the demands of the Roman primate, to all of which they returned a positive refusal.

This rejection of his over- tures roused the anger of Augustin, and, assuming the gift of prophecy, he declared, that, because they would not aid in the conversion of the Saxons, by the swords of the Saxons they should perish.

A few years after the death of the primate, this fetal prophecy met its fulfilment at the hands of a Northum- brian king who ordered the slaughter of the monks of Bangor.

Other states of the Heptarchy soon followed the example of Kent. About a. In less than ninety years from the first coming of St. Augustin and his forty monks, nearly the whole of the Saxon Heptarchy had been converted to Christianity.

Churches and monasteries arose in every part of the island. For many years the greater number of the priests and monks came from abroad, especially from Rome, and there were eight Koman Archbishops of Canterbury before a Saxon obtained that dignity.

In the year , after nearly four centuries of wars among the different states of the Heptarchy, they were all united under Egbert, king of Wessex, and henceforth are known as one kingdom, called Angle-land or England.

Scarcely was England united under one sovereign before she became the prey of an invasion more savage, if possible, than the Saxon had been.

The English were now made to suffer all the miseries which their forefathers had inflicted upon the Britons, and that too, from a race kindred with themselves.

The pirates who invaded Britain in the fifth century were called Saxons : those who now came into England in the ninth century were called Danes.

They were, however, of the same Scandinavian race. During these four hundred years, from the fifth to the ninth century, the Anglo-Saxons had embraced Christianity, and, entirely abandoning their habits of sea-coving, had become in some degree a civilized people.

Not so with their fierce and pagan brethren on the other side of the Geriflan Ocean. They had grown bolder and stronger ; their wealth and their boast was in their war-ships.

They gloried in the titles of Vikinger and Sea-King. They chose for their emblems the fiercest of birds and beasts of prey, The raven was embroidered on their banners, and the dragon gave shape to their vessels.

They had long been the terror of the sea-coast of Europe, and you may be sure a fiercer set of pirates never turned their prows towards England than the Danish sea-kings of the ninth century.

Great indeed were the calamities which these Northmen 8 - 26 HISTORY OF KNOLAND. Churches, convents, and dwellings were burned, and the land was plundered and wasted.

At first the Danes were only summer marauders, and when autumn came they Bailed away. But by the year they had conquered Northumbria, established a capital at York, and for seven long years had wintered in the land.

Of what race were the Saxons, Jutes, and Angles? Name the several kingdoms of the Heptarchy. Of what race were the Danes?

CHAPTER IV KING ALFRED THE GREAT. KINO ALFRED THB GBEAT. This prince was Alfred, most justly surnamed the Great.. From early childhood he had given promise of future greatness.

When only eight years old he went with his father, King Ethelwulf, on a pilgrimage to Rome. Kome, the queen city of the orld, had lost much of her ancient splendor.

The barbarian had paced her streets and despoiled her glory. Yet in Alfred's time, her beautiful Coliseum, her noble Capitol, her Amphitheatre, her palaces and columns and gateways, were far more perfect than they are at the present day.

Child though he was, the splendor of the papal court and of the imperial city made a deep impression on his mind, as he contrasted it with the almost barbarous rudeness of his own land.

In those days the Bishop of Rome had taken the title of Pope [Papa], and claimed to be the head of the Christian world. With his own hand he poured the sacred oil upon the head of the child Alfred, thus anointing him the future king of England.

The pope performed this ceremony in imitation of the ancient custom of the Jewish law. And surely since the days when the High Priest Samuel anointed the young David king over Israel, never was there a better prince set apart by the anointing oil than Alfred of England.

One day, after his return to his own country, his mother, Osburgha, was reading to her children a Saxon poem, from one of the illuminated or richly painted books of that day.

The boys admired the book. Years had passed by since the anointing oil had been poured by the pope upon Alfred's head. He had seen his three brothers in quick succession mount the throne, and now they were all dead, and the kingdom had fallen 28 HISTORY OF ENGLAND.

The Danes had made it a legacy little to be coveted, for, with the exception of the kingdom of Wessex, they were the real masters of England. One of Alfred's first acts was to build a few vessels.

With these, the daring pirates were met on thQ sea, and in two naval battles the English triumphed. The Danes, however, were not disheartened : they came in still greater numbers, and after many battles, King Anred was obliged to flee.

He sought refuge in a lonely spot in Somersetshire, known still as Athelney, or Prince's Island. One day, whilst lodging in the cottage of a peasant, he was told to watch some oaten bread which the wife of the peasant was baking on the hearth.

The king, whose sad heart was dwelling on the troubles of his realm, forgot his trust. When the woman came in, and found her loaves burning, she scolded well the negligent stranger, exclaiming, " You man!

Alfred remained but a few months in his retreat at Athel- ney. Disguising himself as a minstrel or gleeman, in that ever-welcome character he entered the Danish camp.

Whibt amusing the chiefs with song and story, he observed their numbers and noted their idle security. The Danes asked for peace.

Alfred was as wise as he was brave. If, on the other hand, he could induce them to become Christians, and to settle peaceably in the country for there was land enough and to spare, for both Dane and Saxon , then they might not only become good subjects, but help to drive away other tribes of their fierce countrymen.

KINQ ALFRED THE GREAT. They were accepted. To the Danes was granted that large portion of eastern England which they had overrun.

It was then called Danelagh, or the country under the law of the Dane. But not yet was he to lay aside the warrior. At the end of twelve years Guthrum had died.

Some of his Danes had broken their promises of peace, and welcomed to England new hosts of their plundering countrymen. Then came the famous sea- king, Hastings, with a fleet of two hundred and fifty vessels, and for three years the Raven of Denmark, borne on the standard of this bold chief, was the terror of every province of England At length, however, English valor prevailed, and the defeated and dispirited Hastings sailed away to other lands.

Only four years remained to the life of Alfred, but they were glorious years for England. He divided the kingdom into counties. He established justice and order in the land, and made the laws so respected, that it is said bracelets and jewels might be hung up on the highway, and no man would dare to touch them.

He taught his people to build better houses, and better churches. To his court he invited learned and good men from all countries.

He entertained geographers and navigators, and gained a knowledge of other lands. Hearing of a Christian colony on the coast of Hindoostan, he sent thither an English bishop to visit them.

This long and perilous overland journey was accomplished, and India first heard of that distant isle, which, ere a thousand years had gone by, was to become her ruler.

The worthy bishop brought home rich treasures of spices and gems, and thereby India's products first became known to the Anglo-Saxon.

King Alfred established schools, and provided for the 80 HISTORT OF ENGLAND. The world-renowned University of Oxford looks back with gratitude to this good king as its liberal benefactor, if not its founder.

Ue did much to im- prove the language of his subjects. Hitherto nearly all the books had been written in Latin, which few of the people could read.

Alfred ordered " all good and useful books" to be translated into English. He was himself a scholar, and translated the Book of Psalms, and other portions of God's word.

A more precious legacy could hardly have been left by a ruler to his subjects. Alfred divided his time into three portions.

Eight hours were given to the aflfairs of the state, eight to study and devo- tion, and eight to sleep, exercise, and refreshment.

Clocks and watches were unknown, and to supply their place, Alfred invented time-candles. These were made of wax, notched at regular intervals, and indicated by their burning the flight of the hours.

It is pleasant to dwell upon the graces and virtues of Eng- land's noblest monarch. When we remember that, amid all the cares of government, and labors of study,, he was suflering from a painful disease, which his physicians could neither understand nor cure, still more wonderful will appear the brightness of his character.

Nor shall we deem it strange, that through a thousand years his name. In the year , at the age of fifty-three, this good man and great sovereign was laid in his tomb in the monastery of Winchester, leaving behind him a name which shall be had in " everlasting remembrance.

ENGLAND UNDER THE DANES. State some of the benefits bestowed by Alfred upon his people. CHAPTER V. They put down insurrections in the Danelagh, taking many towns from those restless Danes, and obliging them to dwell quietly in their own border.

Athel- stane fought with the Welsh, and made them pay tribute of gold and silver, of hawks and hounds. He was the first Saxon sovereign who took the title of King of England.

Even the great Alfred had only styled himself " King of the West- Saxons.! The population was Danish nevertheless, and subjection to an Anglo-Saxon king was a most'unwilling yoke.

They turned their eyes towards the sea, ready to welcome the first pirate chief who would help them to re-establish their own power in the land.

Such an opportunity was offered in the reign of Ethelred, who came to the throne in the year , on the murder of his elder step-brother, Edward, sumamed the Martyr.

This crime had been committed by Elfrida, the mother of Ethelred, in order to place the crown upon his brow. It excited universal horror throughout the nation.

This Dunstan was an ambitious and powerful priest, who for many years, especially during the reigns of Edwy and Edgar, the predecessors of Ethelred, had more truly ruled the realm than the king who wore the crown.

Dunstan tried to persuade the nun, Edgitha, a half-sister of Ethelred, to become queen, but she thought of her murdered brother, and of the short reigns and sad deaths of many a Saxon king, and wisely refused to leave the quiet of the cloister for the perils of a throne.

There was no other heir, and Dunstan was most unwillingly forced to make the young Ethelred king. It is said that, in placing the crown on his brow, the angry archbishop pro- nounced a curse, instead of a blessing, on the unhappy young monarch.

He gave him, also, the nickname of " the Unready. This time the Danish hosts were led by ENGLAND UNDER THE DANES.

Of course they came again, plundering and burning as before. More money was given them, and the l anegeld as the gold given to bribe the Danes away was called rose from ten to sixteen, and finally to twenty-four thousand pounds.

Then the weak King Ethelred tried another means to get rid of the enemy. He married Emma, " the Flower of Normandy," as she waa called.

She was the sister of Kichard, duke of the Normans, and Ethelred hoped, by the aid of these strangers, to drive the Danes from the land.

The Normans, as one might suppose from their name, were themselves Northmen, of the same race originally as the Saxons and Danes.

Nearly a hundred years before the reign of King Ethelred, they had fallen upon France, pretty much as the Saxons had upon England. The French king gave to their leader, Rolfe, or Rollo, a large portion of territory.

The invaders settled therein, broke off their connection with their sea-roving countrymen, gave up even the religion and language of their ancestors.

King Ethelred hoped that by his marriage with Emma of Normandy, Norman sojdiers would come over and help him fight the Danes.

In this hope he was disappointed, and now the third method which he took to rid himself of the enemy, was quite as weak as the other two, and far more wicked.

On the 13th of November, , known as the Festival of St. Brice, he ordered the Danes to be put to death. The fearful, trea- cherous order was obeyed.

In one night, this new Danish population, which, during twenty years of invasion, had become mingled with the English, was laid low by the swords of their hosts and neighbors.

Among the dead was Gunhilda, the sister of the Danish king. When the tidings reached his ears, Sweyn vowed a fearful revenge.

A larger fleet, a more numerous army than had ever before gathered for the invasion of Saxon England, now assembled. To the natural ferocity of the invaders was added a burning thirst for vengeance.

Some carried at their prow such figures as lions, bulls, dolphins, dragons, or armed men of metal, gayly gilded; others carried on their topmast head the figures of large birds, as eagles and ravens, that stretched out their wings and turned with the wind ; the sides of the ship were painted with differ- ent bright colors, and from stem to stern shields of burnished steel were suspended in even lines, and glittered in the sun.

Gold, silver, and embroidered banners were displayed, and the whole wealth of the pirates of the Baltic lent its aid to this barbaric pomp. The ship that bore the royal standard of Sweyn was moulded in the form of an enormous serpent, the sharp head of which formed the prow, while the lengthening tail coiled over the poop.

It was called 'The Great Dragon. No Danegeld could make them depart now. He died before his coronation, and the Danes proclaimed Canute, his son, as king.

The Saxon cause was upheld by a son of Ethelred's, Edmund, surnamed Ironsides. After some battles, the kingdom was divided be- tween the two rulers, Saxon and Dane.

In a few months, however, Edmund Ironsides died, and Canute the Dane be- came full king of England. At the end of nearly two hundred years of invasion, a Danish race of monarchs was thus seated on the English throne.

Canute did not feel very secure in his new kingdom, and cruel were the means he took to render himself more at ease. He said to his Danish warriors, " He who brings me the head of one of my enemies, shall be dearer to me than a brother," XNQLAND UNDER THi: DANES.

The young sons of Edmund Ironsides were sent to Sweden, Canute hoping that the king of that country would cause them to be put to death.

The Swedish king did not murder them, but sent them far away into Hungary, where, beyond the reach of the cruel Dane, they were kindly treated.

There were two other heirs to the English throne. Ethel- red himself was dead, but had left two sons at the court of his Norman brother-in-law.

Canute could not murder these child- ren, but he entered into treaty with their uncle, Duke Riohard, and proposed to make their mother a second time queen of England.

And Emma, the heartless " Flower of Normandy," for the glory of a throne, forgot the love and care she owed her children, and became the wife of this strange Danish king, the cruel enemy of her Saxon husband and their sons.

When Canute had disposed of all his enemies, he became a milder and a better king, and sought to win the favor of his subjects. He gathered round him the minstrels and gleemen, and delighted in old songs and ballads, and even made verses himself for the people.

He made good laws for his kingdom, and becoming a Christian, founded churches and monasteries. One day, disgusted with the flatteries of his courtiers, he caused his throne to be placed on the sea-shore, when the tide was coming in.

Then, as the waves rolled on with their resistless might, he commanded them to retire, " nor presume to wet the edge of his robe.

But though this heartless woman forgot the claims of her Saxon first-born at the court of Normandy, there were those in England who were not unmindful of his rights.

During the reigns of the Danish monarchs, there was a strong Saxon party in England, headed by Godwin, the " Great Earl," as he was called, and his six stalwart sons.

He had been brought up in another land ; he had learned a foreign language, and could scarcely speak the Saxon tongue ; he loved the ways and manners of those among whom he had lived ; he was a stranger in his own kingdom.

In his reign, the coming event of the great Norman conquest cast a broad shadow over the land. Normans filled the English court.

Edward was a most pious king, according to the piety of those days, and won the name of Edward " the Confessor," or " the Saint. Even the archbishopric of Canterbury was given to a foreign pielate.

Norman-French was the language spoken at court and in the halls of justice, and those who sought the royal favor, laid aside their homely Saxon tongue, and studied the language of the strangers.

The simple mark of the cross as the royal signature was abandoned, and in its place was used " the great seal. So completely had the court of England become Norman, that when, in the year , William, the young duke of that country, came over to pay Edward a visit, he found himself so surrounded by the people and the customs of his own duchy, that he could scarcely realize that he had crossed the Channel.

All these things displeased much the Great Earl Godwin and the Saxon party. On the death of Godwin, his son Harold succeeded to his earldom and power, and rose to even a higher place in the affections of the people.

King Edward the Con- fessor had no children, and his life was drawing to its close. SNGLAND UNDER THE DANES. This prince came to England, but shortly after his arrival, died, leaving a son so young and incapable, that no one thought of him as the future king.

The hearts of the English clustered around Earl Harold. The Norman favorites thought of their own duke. When William of Normandy visited England, and saw around him so much that reminded him of his own duchy, the hope, no doubt, arose in his mind, that one day the Saxon court might become Norman, and he the Norman king of England.

William said, moreover, that when he and Edward were boys together in Normandy, the latter had promised, should he ever become king of England, to leave the crown, at his death, to his Norman playfellow.

Harold returned to England. He felt that, should the people make him king, no oath forced from him by the Norman William, should induce him to betray his country to a stranger.

On the eve of the Festival of the Epiphany, in the year , King Edward the Confessor died. He had rebuilt Westminster Abbey from its foundations, and with great solemnity and pomp, his remains were interred in a beautiful tomb within the sacred walls of the newly-finished edifice.

Who were the Normans? RelaU some of his acts. CHAPTER VI. THE LAST OF THE SAXON KINGS. WILLIAM THE NORMAlf PREPARKS TO INVADE ENGLAND — HAROLD REPELS THE INVASION OF T0STI6 — THE BATTLE OF HASTINGS.

The Saxon chroniclers assert that Edward, before his death, named Harold, the son of Earl Godwin, as his suc- cessor.

Be this as it may, the crown was placed upon the brow of the Saxon earl a few hours only after the saint-king had been laid in his tomb.

William, the Norman duke, was hunting in his park, near the royal city of Rouen, when the tidings of Edward's death and Harold's coronation reached him.

Casting aside his bow and arrows, he hastened in silence to his palace. So dreadfully agitated did he seem, that for a time none dared approach or speak with him.

At length a favorite courtier arrived at the palace, and ventured to ask the duke the cause of his uneasiness. In a large assembly which was held in one of the Norman towns, Fitz- Osborn, a staunch friend of William's, tried to persuade the people to yield to his wishes.

When the people heard this false message, the council hall rang with cries of " No! William, hiding his wrath, took the chief members of the assembly, one by one, and spoke to them in such persuasive words of the great glory and wealth which would be gained by this expedition, that their prejudices were overcome, and as each one gave his own consent, he used his influence to win over others.

By degrees all opposition was overcome, and the wily William had the written promise of his people's aid. Then the Norman duke published his ban of war in other countries, and adventurers from all parts flocked to his stand- ard.

Peter; and a letter giving him per- mission to conquer England, on condition that he should hold it in subjection to the Holy See.

To this letter was affixed a round leaden seal, called in Latin, " bulla," and from this has come the name of "bull," as applied to pontifical decrees bearing this seal.

The sound of preparation was heard through all the Norman land. Smiths, armorers, and ship-builders wrought incessantly, and by midsummer a fleet of six hundred large vessels, and many smaller transports, had assembled on the coast of Normandy.

When William had overcome all human obstacles to his plans, then arose those over which no mortal has control. The winds were contrary, and for more than a morfth kept William's fleet idle on the shores of his own duchy.

Idleness bred discontent. The soldiers and sailors began to say, " He is mad I that man is very mad who seeks to take possession of another's country!

God is angry at such designs, and this He shows now, by refusing us a fair wind. Valery a famous French saipt carried in procession through the camp on the sea-shore.

Prayers were made to the saint, and the soldiers, believing in his intercession, grew more hopeful. The next day the wind became favorable, and the Norman fleet sailed for the English coast.

From Duke William's vessel, the gift of his wife the Countess Matilda , floated the pope's consecrated banner, surmounted by a cross. The silken sails were of many bright colors, parts of the ship were gilt, and the Three Lions of Normandy, the duke's arms, were em- blazoned in many places.

On the prow was the figure of a child, holding a drawn bow, the arrow pointing, with the ship's head, towards the English coast. On the 28th September, , this formidable fleet cast anchor off the shores of Sussex.

As William stepped on shore, he fell, but recovering himself instantly, prevented the superstitious fears of his army, by crying out, showing them a handful of English sand, " See, I have taken possession of the land by my hands, and as far as it extends it is mine, — it is yours.

Let us leave them here, and turn to the preparations which King Harold was making to resist this great army. Before William began to make ready for the invasion of England, he THE LAST OP THE SAXON KINGS.

Harold simply replied : " It is true that I made an oath to William, but I made it under the influence of force; I promised that which belongs not to me, and engaged to do what I never could do ; for my royalty is not mine, nor can I dispose of it without the consent of my country.

William was not his only enemy. A treacherous brother, named Tostig, who had been banished from England, now sought revenge.

Aided by William the Norman, and accompanied by Harold Hardrada, a king of Norway, he landed, September , in the neighborhood of York.

Hardrada was the last of that race of Vikingirs, who had for so many centuries been the terror of England.

To encounter this enemy. King Harold marched northward, leaving the southern coast, where the storm of war was so soon to burst, exposed to all its fury.

Before the battle, which was fought at Stamford Bridge, the English king sent to Tostig, ofiering him peace, friendship, and restoration to his ancient honors.

When the Northmen tell the story of this day, they shall never say that Earl Tostig forsook King Hardrada, the son of Sigurd.

He and I have one mind, and one resolve, and that is, either to die in battle, or to possess all England. Both were slain on the battle-field, and their army was driven from the land.

Scarcely had Harold gained this victory, when news came that William, duke of Normandy, had landed in England. He turned with his army southward. And now, as the year drew near its close, the great battle was to be fought, which should decide whether the Norman duke or the Saxon earl should wear the crown of England.

Battle Abbey afterwards arose to commemorate this figbt. Around it gathered brave English hearts. On Saturday, the 14th October, the action began.

The Normans advanced, singing the war-songs of ancient heroes, and raising their battle-cry, " Our Lady! Our Lady!

When the sun went down, the brave Harold had fallen, and the banner of Duke William, "the Three Lions of Normandy," floated triumphant over the bloody field of victory.

The battle of Hastings had been fought, and the Norman conquest was begun. Describe the vessel in which William embarked.

CONDITION OF ENGLAND UNDER THE SAXONS. CONDITION OP ENGLAND UNDER THE SAXONS. RELIGION— LITER1. TUBE — MANNERS AND CUSTOMS.

Let us now glance at the condition of the Saxon people at the time of the Norman conquest. First, as regards religion : the pure light of Christianity had become dim by the corrupt practices of an age of superstition.

Fasting and penance, or the infliction of suffering on the body, was too often inculcated in the place of that scriptural repentance which leads to godly sorrow for sin and amendment of life.

The building of a church or monastery, or a pilgrimage to Eome, atoned, it was believed, for the darkest crimes.

Thus the wicked Elfrida, the mother of King Ethelred the Unready, in her old age, founded churches and monasteries, to make amends for the sins of her former life.

Thus, too, Canute, the Dane king, went on a pilgrimage to Rome, because his soul was troubled with remorse for the blood wh ch he had shed, and the crimes which he had committed.

Robbing the English people of their money to bestow in alms on foreign churches, with pilgrim's wallet and staff, he found his way to Italy.

The treasures he brought back with him were, the bones of dead saints, and " holy relics," — such as the arm of St.

Augusfine, for which he had paid one hundred talents of gold, and the same amount of silver. The monks pretended to work mira- cles.

The people were taught to call upon the saints, for aid and intercession. The word of God, whose entrance giveth light, was shut up from the laity in a foreign tongue.

Dunstan, the abbot of Glastonbury afterwards Primate of England , was, both in his accomplishments and the means by which he gained his reputation for sanctity, a fair specimen of the monk of this age.

He was a fine musician, a painter, 44 HISTORY OF ENGLAND. He gained the character of a saint by living in a cell so small that he could not lie down in it at full length, and by subsisting on the coarsest and most meagre fare.

When, by these means, combined with his natural talents for command, he had risen to power and influence, he proclaimed himself a reformer of the church.

This reforma- tion consisted in obliging those priests who were married secular clergy they were called to put away their wives, abandon their families, and go to live in monasteries, like the monks or regulars.

The quarrel between these two parties was long and bitter. Gradually, the monks prevailed, but it was not until after the twelfth century, that celibacy became the general practice of the Church.

In those dark times of superstition, it is pleasant to dwell upon a spot illuminated by the pure light of the gospel. Such seems to have been the little rocky island of lona, on the western coast of Scotland.

There, in the sixth century, St. Columba, an Irish monk, founded a monastery, and estab- lished a little colony of Christians.

There they lived, owning no subjection to the Church of Rome, and only preaching " such works of charity and piety as they could learn from Holy Scriptures.

Although monasteries and convents were in many instances places where idle and even wicked lives were led, yet were they very frequently sanctuaries for the oppressed, and the only refuge in those rude times for the weak and defenceless.

Nor must we forget that to the life-long labor of many a monk, we owe the books which have come down to our times. Every monastery had its writing-room, and there copies of ancient works were transcribed on sheets of vellum or parchment.

Paper was not then invented, and as parchment was costly, the previous writing was sometimes effaced to make room for the new.

Many a time, in this way, some old and precious manuscript may have been erased, to give place to lives of CONDITION OP ENGLAND UNDER THE SAXONS.

Often the long lifetime of a monk would be spent in copying and illuminating a single book. These copies and illuminations were very beautiful.

We hear of the gospels impressed in silver letters upon violet-colored parchment, and. They were as valuable, and were looked after with as much care, as a farm would be in our days, and the fortune of a king could scarcely buy as much reading as may now be found in a child's library.

The monasteries were the schools of those days. There Latin and Greek were taught, as well as astronomy and theol- ogy.

In painting, music, sculpture, and architecture, the monks were well skilled. Westminster Abbey rose in the days of Edward the Confessor.

To the building of this mag- nificent structure, which was the pride of his heart, the Saint- king devoted a tenth of his revenue ; but he scarcely lived to see it completed, and was the first of that long line of English monarchs who have been laid to rest within its walls.

At Christmas, at Easter, and at Whitsuntide, the Saxon kings summoned the great council of the nation. It was called the Witenagemot.

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